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In Freedom's Cause

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In Freedom's Cause

Postby Hothir Ethelnor » Thu Apr 13, 2006 7:46 pm

Ok, this is where the story of Scottish independance as told by G.A Henty, will form.
Remember to only post parts of the story here,
if you want to discuss this project, please visit the other post I started earlier. here http://www.classic-castle.com/forum/vie ... php?t=7322
please also keep the story in chronological order.
and... have fun. :D
"The lad parried it, and leaping back, struck at the horse's leg. The animal fell instantly, and as he did so Archie struck full on the helm of Sir John Kerr" Excerpt from, In Freedoms Cause by G.A Henty
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Postby Hothir Ethelnor » Thu Apr 13, 2006 8:49 pm

"No inconsiderable portion of Archie's time was occupied in acquiring the use of arms from Sandy Graham. His mother, quiet and seemingly resigned as she was, yet burned with the ambition that he should some day avenge his father's death, and win back his father's lands. She said little to him of her hopes; but she roused his spirit by telling him stories of the brave deeds of the Forbeses and Seatons, and she encouraged him from his childhood to practise in arms with Sandy Graham.ImageIn this respect indeed, Archie needed no stimulant. From Sandy even more than from his mother he had heard of his father's brave deeds in arms; and although, from the way in which she repressed any such utterances, he said but little to his mother, he was resolved as much as she could wish him to be, that he would some day win back his patrimony, and avenge his father upon his slayers.
Consequently, upon every opportunity when Sandy Graham could spare time from his multifarious work, Archie practised with him, with sword and pike,Image
At first he had but a wooden sword. Then, as his limbs grew stronger, he practised with a blunted sword; and now at the age of fifteen Sandy Graham had as much as he could do to hold his own with his pupil.
Last edited by Hothir Ethelnor on Sat Apr 15, 2006 11:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Hothir Ethelnor » Sat Apr 15, 2006 11:21 pm

"That evening Archie said to his mother, "How is it mother, that the English Knight whom I today saw ride past with the Kerr is governer of our Scottish town of Lanark?"
"You may well wonder, Archie, for there are many in Scotland of older years than you who marvel that Scotsmen who have always been free, should tolerate so strange a thing. It is a long story, and a tangled one; but to-morrow morning I will draw out for you a genealogy of the various claimants for the throne, and you will see how the thing has come about, and under what pretence Edward of England has planted his garrisons in this free Scotland of ours."
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Postby Hothir Ethelnor » Tue Apr 18, 2006 9:41 pm

The next morning Archie did not forget to remind his mother of her promise.
"You must know," she began, "that our good King Alexander had three children-David, who died when a boy; Alexander who married a daughter of the Count of Flanders, and died childless; and a daughter, Margaret, who married Eric, the young King of Norway. Three years ago the Queen of Norway died, leaving an only daughter, also named Margaret, who was called among us the 'Maid of Norway' who, at her mother's death, became heir-presumptive to the throne, and as such was recognized by an assembly of the estates at scone. But we all hoped that the king would have male heirs, for early last year, while still in the prime of life, he married Joleta, daughter of the Count of Drew. Unhappily, on the 19th of March, he attended a council in the castle of Edinburgh, and on his way back to his wife at Kinghorn, on a stormy night, he fell over a precipice and was killed.
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"The hopes of the country now rested on the 'Maid of Norway,' who alone stood between the throne and a number of claimants, most of whom would be prepared to support thier claims by arms, and thus bring unnumbered woes upon Scotland. Most unhappily for the country, the maid died on her voyage to Scotland, and the succession therefore became open...
The three principal competitors-Bruce, Baliol, and Comyn-and their friends, at once began to arm; but William Fraser, Bishop of St. Andrews, a friend of Baliol, wrote King Edward suggesting that he should act as arbitrator, and more hinting that if he chose Baliol he would find him submissive in all things to his wishes. Edward jumped at the proposal, and thereupon issued summonses to the barons of the northern counties to meet him at Norham on the 3rd of June; and a mandate was issued to the sheriffs of Northumberland, Cumberland, Westmoreland, York, and Lancaster to assemble the feudal array at the same rendezvous.
"When the court opened, Roger Brabazon, the king's justiciary, delivered an address, in which he stated that Edward, as lord-paramount of Scotland, had come there to administer justice between the compettitore for the crown, and concluded with the request that all present should acknowledge his claim as lord-paramount. Th Scottish nobles present, with the exception of those who were privy to Edward's designs, were filled with astonishment and dismay at this pretension, and declared their ignorance of any claim of superiority of the king of England over Scotland. The king, in a passion, exclaimed: " 'By holy Edward, whose crown I wear, I will vindicate my just rights, or perish in the attempt!'
"However, he saw that nothing could be done on the instant, and adjourned the meeting for three weeks, at the end of which time the prelates, nobles, and community of Scotland were invited to bring forward whatever they could in opposition to his claim of supremacy...
Last edited by Hothir Ethelnor on Wed Apr 19, 2006 2:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Hothir Ethelnor » Wed Apr 19, 2006 2:56 am

"When the meeting was opened the prelates and nobles present advanced nothing to disprove Edward's claim to supremacy. The representatives of the commons, however, did show reason against the claim, for which, indeed, my son, as every man in Scotland knows, there is not a shadow of foundation.
"The King's chancellor declared that there was nothing in these objections to Edward's claim, and therefore he resolved, as lord-paramount, to determine the question of succession. The various competitors were asked whether they acknowledged Edward as lord-paramount, and were willing to recieve his judgement as such; and the whole of these wretched traitors proceeded to barter thier country for thier hopes of a crown, acknowledged Edward as lord-paramount, and left the judgement in his hands.
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"Bruce and Baliol recieved handsome presents for thus tamely yielding the rights of Scotland. All present at once agreed that the castles and strongholds of Scotland should be surrendered into the hands of English commanders and garrisons. This was immediately done; and thus it is, Archie, that you see an English officer lording it over the Scotch town of Lanark.
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Postby Hothir Ethelnor » Fri Apr 21, 2006 2:25 am

This conversation sank deeply into Archie's mind; day and night he thought of nothing but the lost freedom of Scotland, and vowed that even the hope of regaining his father's lands from the Kerrs, should be secondary to that of freeing his country. All sorts of wild dreams did the boy turn over in his mind; he was no longer light hearted, but walked about moody and thoughtful. He redoubled his assiduity in the practise of arms; and sometimes when fighting with Sandy, he would think that he had an English man-at-arms before him, and would strike so hotly and fiercely that Sandy had the greatest difficulty in parrying his blows, and was forced to shout lustily to recall him from the clouds. He no longer played at ball with the village lads; but, taking the elder of them aside, he swore them to secrecy, and then formed them into a band, which he called the Scottish Avengers. With them he would retire into valleys far away from the village, where none would mark what they were doing, and there they practised with club and stake instead of broadsword and pike, defending narrow passes against imaginary enemy, and, dividing into two parties, they did battle with each other.
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The lads entered into the new diversion with spirit. Among the lower class throughout Scotland the feeling of indignation at the manner in which their nobles had sold their country to England was deep and passionate. They knew the woes which English demination had brought upon Wales and Ireland; and though as yet without a leader, and at present hopeless of a successful rising, every true Scotchman was looking forward to the time when an attempt might be made to throw off the English yoke...
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Postby Hothir Ethelnor » Tue Apr 25, 2006 1:59 pm

One day Wallace was fishing in the Irvine when Earl Percy, the governer of Ayr, rode past with a numerous train. Five of them remained behind and asked Wallace for the fish he had taken. He replied that they were welcome to half of them. Not satisfied with this, they seized the basket and prepared to carry it off. Wallace resisted, and one of them drew his sword. Wallace seized the staff of his net and struck his opponent's sword from his hand; this he snatched up and stood on gaurd, while the other four rushed upon him.
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Wallace smote the first so terrible a blow that his head was cloven from skull to collar-bone; with the next blow he severed the right arm of another, and then disabled a third. The other two fled,
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and overtaking the earl, called on him for help; "for," they said, "three of our number who stayed behind with us to take some fish from the Scot who was fishing are killed or disabled."
"How many were your assailants?" asked the earl.
"But the man himself," they answered; "a desperate fellow whom we could not withstand."
"I have a brave company of followers!" the earl said with scorn. "You allow one Scot to overmatch five of you! I shall not return to seek for your adversary; for were I to find him I should respect him too much to do him harm."
Many other similar deeds did Wallace perform; his fame grew more and more, as did the feeling among Scotch peasantry that in him they had found their champion and leader.
Archie eagerly drank in the tale of Wallace's exploits, and his soul was fired by the desire to follow so valiant a leader. He was now sixteen, his frame was set and vigorous, and excercise and constant practice with arms had hardened his muscles. He became restless with his life of inactivity; and his mother, seeing that her quiet and secluded existence was no longer suitible for him, resolved to send him to her sister's husband, Sir Robert Gordon, who dwelt near Lanark.
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Postby Hothir Ethelnor » Sun Apr 30, 2006 2:49 am

The next morning Archie started soon after daybreak. On his back he carried a wallet, in which was a new suit of clothes suitable for one of the rank of a gentleman, which his mother had with great stint and difficulty procured for him. He strode briskly along, proud of the posession of a sword for the first time. It was in itself a badge of manhood, for at that time all men went armed.
As he neared the Gates of Lanark he saw a party issue out and ride towards him, recognizing in their leader Sir John Kerr. He pulled his cap down over his eyes, and strode forward, keeping by the side of the road that the horsemen might pass freely, but paying no heed to them otherwise.
"Hallo, sirrah!" Sir john exclaimed, reining in his horse, "who are you who pass a knight and a gentleman on the highway without vailing his bonnet in respect?"
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"I am a gentleman and the son of a knight," Archie said, looking fearlessly up into the face of his questioner.
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"I am Archie Forbes, and I vail my bonnet to no man living save those whom I respect and honour."
So saying without another word he strode forward to the town. Sir John looked darkly after him.
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"Red Roy," he said sternly, turning to the one who rode behind him, "you have failed your trust. I told you to watch the boy, and from time to time you brought me news that he was growing up but a village churl. He is no churl, and unless I mistake me, he will someday be dangerous. Let me know when he next returns to the village; we must take then take speedy steps for preventing him from becoming troublesome."
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